Cart 0

Expert's Corner — woodfinishing

TIP: Water-Based Finish Should Powder

powder sandpaper surface the finishing store water-based wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

TIP: Water-Based Finish Should Powder

As with all finishes, you should always sand the first coat of water-based finish smooth because it always dries rough to the touch. It’s also the best policy to sand additional coats smooth after they dry to remove dust nibs and other flaws, until the last coat, which you can leave as is.Water-based finishes dry rapidly, almost as fast as the water evaporates from the finish. So the drying occurs quicker on hot or dry days and slower on cold or humid days. How do you know when the finish is dry? It powders on the sandpaper and on the...

Read more →


Spraying Latex Paint with HVLP Systems

finish floetrol fluid glass grit smooth spray the finishing store wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

Spraying Latex Paint with HVLP Systems

HVLP systems are not designed to spray heavier bodied latex paint. However, with some understanding you can successfully do so. The viscosity (thickness) of latex paint makes it hard for spray guns to fully atomize the paint, meaning that it's difficult with a lower pressure turbine unit to break the material up into small enough particles to get an ultra smooth surface. It is essential that you use a good 4 or 5-stage turbine simply for the added pressure and power. The second thing is to use a larger needle/nozzle. A 1.8mm or larger works best. You will also want...

Read more →


A Glossary Of Basic Finishing Technology

basic finish gel glaze glossary liquid pine sattin stain the finishing store wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

A Glossary Of Basic Finishing Technology

As with any technical field, understanding the terminology of finishing is critical. It’s also critical that we all mean the same thing with the terms we use. With that in mind, here are some of the most common finishing terms, in alphabetical order, and their definitions. Bleach is a chemical that removes stains and, sometimes, the natural color from wood. The three types of bleach are chlorine (sodium hypochlorite), which removes dye color without changing the color of the wood; oxalic acid, which removes rust marks and lye stains without changing the color of the wood; and two-part bleach (sodium...

Read more →


“Equalizing” Sapwood

coloring dye finish stain the finishing store wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

Finishing Tip by Bob FlexnerBut it’s usually better to equalize the sapwood to the color of the heartwood.One method is to bleach the wood using two-part bleach (sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide). This will remove the coloring from the heartwood, so you can then stain the wood back to the color you want.To achieve an even coloring with darker colored woods, it’s always best to use only heartwood to begin with. But this isn’t always possible. So you may want to “equalize” the coloring of the sapwood and heartwood. The easier way to do this, if you intend to stain...

Read more →


Wetting to Predict Blotching

evaporate mineral paint residue spirits the finishing store thinner wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

Wetting to Predict Blotching

You can usually get a pretty good idea whether or not the wood you are using will blotch when a stain or finish is applied by wetting the wood.You can use any liquid, but water will raise the grain causing you to have to sand more. Mineral spirits (paint thinner) works well except if you intend to apply a water-based finish. Some residue oiliness may remain and cause the finish to fish eye—that is, bunch up into ridges rather than level out.Denatured alcohol would be better for this situation because it will totally evaporate. But it evaporates quickly, so you...

Read more →