Cart 0

Expert's Corner — woodfinishing

TIP: Benzene and Benzine

benzne bob england flexner gasoline naphtha oil oily surface surfaces the finishing store us wood woodfinishing

Benzene and benzine are not the same thing. Though they are often confused or used interchangeably in books and magazines, they are very different. Benzene is carcinogenic and was removed from the consumer market 40 years ago. Before then it was often used as a paint and varnish remover. Benzine is another name for naphtha in the US, though the term is rarely used in this manner anymore. It’s also a common name for gasoline in England. Naphtha (benzine) is a faster evaporating, less oily (“drier”) form of mineral spirits. It’s not dangerous if used in moderation. Here’s an easy...

Read more →


TIP: Removing Wine Stains from Unfinished Wood

chlorine color counter flexner lighter powder scrouring shrink-wraps spot spotajax surface surfaces the finishing store wood woodfinishing

Here are two methods for removing stains caused by spilled red wine on unfinished wood—for example, on a butcher-block countertop. 1.    Mix some Oxi-Clean with water to make a paste and put it on the affected area. Check after a few minutes to be sure it’s doing something. If so, leave it for a short time until the wine stain is removed.2.    Scrub the wood with a scouring powder, such as Ajax, that contains a little chlorine bleach. If either of these methods leaves a lighter spot on the wood, apply the cleaning solution to the entire surface so it...

Read more →


TIP: Understanding Gloss and Satin

agent coats dries film finish finishing flatting flexner gloss reflecting satin shrink-wraps the finishing store woodfinishing woodworking

TIP: Understanding Gloss and Satin

It’s the last coat you apply that establishes the sheen of your finish. In other words, if the sheen you’re getting is not to your liking, just apply another coat of finish on top with the sheen you want, and that’s what you’ll get. Sheens range from high gloss to dead flat. Gloss reflects an image almost like a mirror. Flat disrupts the image so much that you may not be able to see it at all. All finishes except gloss contain flatting agent that is responsible for the flatter look. This flatting agent (tiny particles of silica, which you...

Read more →


Finishing Nightmares

Charles Neil filling finish finishing shiny the finishing store turpine wax woodfinishing woodworking

Ironically I just finished making a DVD by the same title, but that is not what this is about. I get a lot of emails from folks who have tried to get a good finish by following poor advice, but usually it is the result of poor products, they just don’t know it. There is an old cliché, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is” and nowhere does this prove truer than in finishing. I got an email from a guy who was trying to get a fully filled, high gloss finish on a red oak...

Read more →


How to Prep for a Flawless Painted Finish

blemish components compound cracks dap filling finish finishing imperfections latex result the finishing store woodfinishing

While we may think that applying a film finish such as lacquer or polyurethane over natural wood can be a challenge, here’s a much tougher one: achieving a flawless painted finish. Blemishes in a clear film finish are disguised by the color and grain pattern of the wood. There’s no such hiding place with paint. Light playing across a painted surface only draws attention to any surface defects – and any pattern of wood grain showing through paint now becomes a defect instead of a feature.As with most things, there’s good news and bad news about this. The good news:...

Read more →