Cart 0

Expert's Corner — wiped

Finishing Terms Defined by Bob Flexner: What is Pickling?

coat stain the finishing store wiped wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

Finishing Terms Defined by Bob Flexner: What is Pickling?

In wood finishing the term “pickling” is generally used to mean adding a white coloring to the wood. (“Liming” is sometimes used to mean the same thing.) There are two broad methods of pickling. One is to wipe on and wipe off a white stain. The other involves sealing the wood with a first coat of finish, then wiping on and wiping off a stain. There is a big difference in the appearance you get. In the sample shown, a white stain was applied directly to the lower half of the panel and wiped off. The same white stain was applied over a sealer...

Read more →


Wiping Off Excess Stain

coat off stain the finishing store wet wiped wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

The rule for applying stain successfully is to apply a wet coat and wipe off the excess before the stain dries. There’s no problem doing this with common oil-based wiping stains. They dry very slowly, so there’s plenty of time to get the excess wiped off before the stain dries. But water-based and lacquer stains dry rapidly, so it’s often difficult to get all the excess wiped off before the stain begins to set up. An example of the problems with water-based stain is shown in the accompanying picture. Here are three ways to overcome the problem: If possible, divide...

Read more →


Applying Finish With or Across the Grain

excess finish flexners grain off spray spraying stain streaks the finishing store wiped wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

It’s common to be instructed to apply a finish in the direction of the grain, called “with the grain.” Doing this is usually best when brushing a finish, but it’s rarely necessary when wiping or spraying a finish. Brushing with the grain is best because the grain will help disguise the brush marks, the ridges and troughs caused by the movement of the bristles along or across the surface. If you brush across the grain, the brush marks will stand out in contrast to the grain of the wood. There are exceptions, however. These include solid or veneer with their...

Read more →