Cart 0

Expert's Corner — water

TIP: How to Repair Dents and Gouges

cloth dry grain hot iron steam swells the finishing store water wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

TIP: How to Repair Dents and Gouges

Dents and gouges are both flaws in the wood. But they are not the same thing, so they should be repaired differently. Dents are compressed wood. The wood fibers are still intact, just pressed down or indented. Gouges are also indentations, but the wood fibers have been torn and usually some of the wood has been removed. Dents can usually be steamed level. Gouges have to be filled with wood putty or some other filling material. Sometimes the indentation is not clearly a dent or gouge, so you can try steaming before resorting to filling. To steam out a dent,...

Read more →


Using Reflected Light to Advantage

fill finish finishes gouge jar repair runs the finishing store water wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

Using Reflected Light to Advantage

You should never have runs or sags in your dried finish. The trick to avoiding them is to spot them before the finish dries and remove them with a brush. The way to see runs and sags developing is to look at the surface in a reflected light, as shown in the accompanying picture. You may need to move your head, walk around, or even arrange some special lights other than the overhead lights or the light coming in through a window. Repairing Finishes Once you have spotted the problem, use a brush to brush out the excess finish even...

Read more →


TIP: Dye Migration

blotch darker dye grain the finishing store thinned trick water wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

TIP: Dye Migration

The general consensus on figured woods is pretty much saturation, or using a trace coat to further intensify the grain. However sometimes a dye can migrate, meaning it just goes way too dark and can create a blotchy mess. Broad curl woods like Curly Cherry, Flame Birch, etc. can also absorb any colorant unevenly. We've looked at many ways to help control this. I want to emphasize how important it is that you do a test on a scrap before you dive in. With that said one of my favorite tricks is to use water to help control the absorption....

Read more →


Water Warps Wood Opposite From What You May Think

boards compressions drying out shrinkage the finishing store water wetting wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

Water causes wood to swell, so most people think that wetting one side and not the other will cause the wetted side to bow – that is, increase in width so the center is higher than the edges. If the wood is thin enough, this will be the case initially. But the overall swelling or shrinking after many wettings and dryings out, no matter the thickness of the wood, will be the opposite. The wetted side will shrink and the wood, or boards, will cup. The four accompanying pictures show examples of this. With a little thought, you will most...

Read more →


TIP: Rubbing Lubricant Comparison

finishes lubrication mineral minerals oil soapy spirits straight the finishing store water wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

Many different lubricants are recommended for rubbing out finishes with an abrasive. Here’s how they differ. The more waxy or oily the lubricant the better it reduces scratching and sandpaper clogging but the slower it cuts. The more watery the lubricant the more aggressive the cutting but the more pronounced the scratches. So wax is the most lubricating of the common lubricants suggested. Oil would be next, followed by a mixture of oil and mineral spirits. On the more aggressive side, straight mineral spirits (paint thinner) still provides some lubrication while allowing the abrasive to cut effectively. Soapy water provides...

Read more →