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Expert's Corner — tip

Select The Right Brush and Use the Right Technique To Get The Best Possible Finish

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There are two critical elements that make for a great finish - selecting the right brush, and using the right technique. Practice counts as well. You don't expect to cut perfect dovetails the first time round, nor should you expect to achieve a perfect finish without practicing your finishing technique. I frequently choose brushing because I have a small shop and brush clean-up is fairly quick. Most of my finishing is done with shellac or varnish. Occasionally I'll use a water-based finish for light-coloured woods when I want a super clear finish. However, I've never used lacquer, so my comments...

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Tip 1: Strain Product: Always

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Tip 1: Strain Product: Always

Straining is a topic that we talk a lot about in our Prep to Finish paint training program (preptofinish.com). Conventional wisdom and common sense dictate that straining is a great way to remove contaminants from product while it is still in liquid form. This is certainly true, but there are other, more subtle considerations that make straining a good idea.Specifically, building the habit of straining ALL product every time you load your cup gun is cheap insurance at a deeper level. As the product world transitions more into waterborne platforms, the practice of shaking a can of product is not...

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TIP: Refinishing and Value

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Many people are confused about whether or not to refinish old furniture whose finish is in bad shape. They don’t really like living with the furniture, but they’ve heard (usually directly or indirectly from the Antiques Roadshow) that refinishing destroys value, and they surely don’t want to do that. A finish serves two purposes. It protects the wood from contact with liquids, and it makes the wood look better, usually richer and deeper. The finish protects and decorates. Clearly the finish in the accompanying picture does neither. In almost all cases it should be removed and replaced with a new...

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