Cart 0

Expert's Corner — solvent

How to Choose a Finish: Part II

finishes heat moisture solvent stripping the finishing store tinker wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

How to Choose a Finish: Part II

For an overview of choosing a finish please refer to “How to Choose a Finish: Part I.” To better understand finishes and their differences, it’s very helpful to put them into categories by the way they cure. You may think the resins—polyurethane, alkyd, acrylic, etc.—make the big difference in finishes, but they don’t. Consider, for example, that polyurethane resin is used in varnish, water-based finish, two-part finish and in some lacquers. If you have used any two of these finishes, you know they are very different. The curing process the finish goes through is far more significant for understanding each...

Read more →


How to Choose a Finish: Part I

finish furniture refinishers solvent the finishing store wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

How to Choose a Finish: Part I

The first step in finishing a project (beyond preparing the wood, of course) is to choose the finish you want to use. In fact, it's wise to make this choice even before starting on the project because it may influence the wood you choose. There are seven broad categories of finishes to choose from: Oil and blends of oil and varnish (often called "Danish" oil) Varnish, which includes polyurethane varnish, spar varnish, wiping varnish (varnish thinned about half with mineral spirits) and gel varnish Shellac, which can be clear or amber and with its natural wax included or removed Lacquer,...

Read more →


Step Up to Spray Finishing

air compressors finish hvlp pressurized psi solvent the finishing store turbines wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

Step Up to Spray Finishing

The vast majority of hobbyist woodworkers, and quite a few professional woodworkers - who might only complete a project or two a month - do their finishing with brush or rag. However, as you begin to undertake more projects, or you move to larger carcass work, it's natural to start thinking about spray finishing. There are at least three good reasons for considering a switch to spray finishing. First, it's surprisingly easy to achieve a near perfect finish with spraying. With practice, you'll be able to apply the finish evenly and uniformly in a lot less time than you would...

Read more →


TIP: Spraying Lacquer Over a Paint or Finish

blister drying finish lacquer solvent the finishing store wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking wrinkle

There are risks to spraying any type of solvent lacquer over any existing, and older, paint or finish. The problem is the lacquer thinner in the lacquer. A wet application can cause many paints and finishes to wrinkle or blister, even an old coat of lacquer itself. The two easiest ways to avoid problems are to spray several light (almost dust) coats of lacquer to get a bit of a build before applying wet coats, or to apply a coat of shellac before spraying the lacquer. Both methods will create a barrier to keep the existing coating from being excessively...

Read more →


TIP: How to Avoid a Lot of Sanding with Oil Finishes

grit oil sandpaper solvent the finishing store tung wet coat wood woodfinishing woodwork woodworking

It’s not necessary to sand above 180 or 220 grit when applying an oil or oil/varnish blend finish. You can achieve the same smooth feeling results by sanding each coat after the first while that coat is still wet on the wood. You are wiping off all the excess anyway, so sanding dust isn’t a problem. Here are the steps: Sand the wood to 180 or 220 grit, sanding in the direction of the grain. Apply a wet coat of boiled linseed oil, 100% tung oil, your own mixture or oil and varnish or one of a number of commercial...

Read more →